Things Only Adults Noticed In Frozen 2

, , 100 Comments


Like its predecessor, the long-awaited Frozen
2 is ostensibly a movie for children, but lots of grown-ups are watching it. If anything, Frozen 2 doubles down on bits
that seem aimed squarely at adults. Here’s a look at just a few of the most memorable. The first Frozen film received a fair amount
of criticism for its lack of diversity. The movie’s main cast and most, if not all,
background characters were white. Defenders of the film cited the apparent setting
of medieval Scandinavia as the reason for the whiteness, but that excuse didn’t really
hold water, as the film’s setting of Arendelle is a fictional kingdom and Scandinavia is
never mentioned. But Disney was clearly paying attention to
the controversy, as Frozen 2 is certainly more diverse. For starters, there is now a prominent black
character. Lt. Mattias, voiced by Sterling K. Brown,
is an Arendellian soldier who shows up early in the film and goes on to appear pretty consistently
throughout. Then there are the Northuldra, a clan of indigenous
people who live in an enchanted forest and are pretty central to Frozen 2’s story. They’re based on the real-life Sámi people
from Scandinavia, and Disney worked with Sámi groups in developing these characters. Kids aren’t likely to notice the effort that
went into increasing Frozen 2’s diversity, but adults will. Despite all the attention Elsa’s sexuality
receives from fans, only Anna has ever shown any interest in romance. In Frozen, she spends much of the film pining
after her suitor, Hans. Then, after he turns out to be the villain,
she falls for Kristoff. “I could kiss you! I could. I mean, I’d like to. May I? We me? I mean… May we? Wait, what?” “We may.” In Frozen 2, it’s made clear from the get-go
that Anna is still very much interested in men, or, well, one man in particular. Anna and Kristoff are very much a couple. They even casually kiss from time to time,
which is kind of an unusual thing to see in a Disney animated movie. But one scene in particular makes it seem
like Anna has more than kissing on the brain. In the film, Anna, Kristoff, Elsa, and Olaf
head out on an adventure together in a wagon pulled by Sven the reindeer. Kristoff and Anna ride together in the front
of the wagon, while Elsa and Olaf sit in the back. At a certain point in the journey, both Olaf
and Elsa doze off, which doesn’t go unnoticed by Anna. She points the situation out to Kristoff and
suggestively asks him what he wants to do before puckering up her lips. Kids will think Anna just wanted a smooch,
but adults know that a mere smooch doesn’t require privacy with the added danger of getting
caught. Anyone who’s seen Frozen knows that Olaf is
full of corny jokes. Kids may love the snowman’s sense of humor,
while to adults, he can get a little annoying. “Olaf, did Elsa build you?” “Yeah. Why?” “Do you know where she is?” “Yeah. Why?” “Do you think you could show us the way?” “Yeah. Why?” “How does this work?” “Ow!” But in Frozen 2, Olaf actually manages to
sneak in a couple one-liners that are aimed squarely at the grown-ups, and one of them
is actually pretty morbid. There’s an old aviation joke regarding black
boxes. So-called black boxes, if you’re unaware,
are flight recorders that are designed to survive a plane crash in order to help investigators
determine what caused it. The joke goes something like this: “If the
black box is crash-proof, then why don’t they make the whole plane out of the black box?” Olaf tells a variation of this joke in the
movie, and he does so at the most inappropriate moment. In the film, Elsa and Anna find the shipwreck
that killed their parents. an unspeakably tragic discovery. Upon finding it, one of them declares that
there should be a record on board in a waterproof box, as that was standard procedure. Olaf then, instead of consoling his friends
in this extremely trying time, asks, quote, “If it’s waterproof, why didn’t they make
the whole ship waterproof?” Kids will laugh at the joke, not knowing that
it’s a reference to a very old joke about airplanes and that Olaf is being extremely
insensitive. Adults, meanwhile, may want to see Olaf melt
even more than they already did. One of the film’s big reveals comes near the
end, when Elsa discovers why Arendelle and the Northuldra had gone to war in the past. It all started because the King of Arendelle,
Elsa and Anna’s grandfather, was a colonizer who, upon discovering the Northuldra, secretly
formulated a plan to destroy them. Why? Because they believe in, and essentially worship,
the magic of the forest. These beliefs differed from his own, which
frightened him, so he constructed a dam on their river under the guise of it being a
gift, and destroyed their land. When called out on this by the Northuldra
leader, the king killed him, igniting the battle between the two people. Frozen 2’s stance on a number of issues has
been clear to critics. The film presents a narrative that shows the
harm done by colonialism, religious bigotry, and environmental recklessness. In the end, the dam must be destroyed to lift
the curse on the forest, symbolizing a return to the natural order of things as well as
the destruction of a symbol of oppression. These are heavy themes, and since they’re
not spelled out in a super obvious manner, kids probably won’t understand a whit of it. With any luck, their parents will explain
it to them. If there’s one theme that best sums up Frozen
2, it’s this: Love thyself. The movie sends Elsa on a journey of self-discovery
to find the meaning in her life she’s been searching for forever, and she ends up finding…herself. Near the start of the film, Elsa hears a strange
siren’s song that no one else can hear. This eventually leads her to the enchanted
forest, where she learns that the four spirits of the forest, air, wind, fire, and earth,
are in disarray. After she learns that she has the power to
tame the spirits, she’s told of a mysterious fifth spirit that acts as a bridge between
all the others. Elsa ventures to find this fifth spirit, the
one who’s been calling to her since the start of the film, and she ends up in a temple trying
to chase down the elusive voice. When she reaches the end of the temple, she
realizes that not only is she the fifth spirit, but she is also the one she’s been searching
for. The film’s message of self-love is an important
one, no matter the viewer, and no matter their age. Everyone needs to love and take care of themselves,
and everyone, even adults, can use a reminder of that from time to time. Even if it’s from a cartoon. Check out one of our newest videos right here! Plus, even more Looper videos about your favorite
stuff are coming soon. Subscribe to our YouTube channel and hit the
bell so you don’t miss a single one.

 

100 Responses

  1. mia4150

    November 29, 2019 1:01 am

    Anyone notice when Elsa was making ice sculptures for people, a little girl asked for a sextant and Elsa's face was concerned for a moment

    Reply
  2. Eve S.

    November 29, 2019 2:02 am

    When they mentioned the 4 elements I was all elsa's the avatar

    And when I saw the 2 moons my inner Stay was all omg it's the 2 moons from side effects the creators are stays

    Reply
  3. A.P Francis

    November 29, 2019 3:43 am

    With the diversity thing, even if it wasn't based in Scandinavia, everyone still would be white. You can see that it's a naturally cold place in Arandelle, even without Elsa's thing it was still green and they're all wearing warm clothes. That means there's almost no way there would be people with darker skin without international travel (or some random place where it suddenly gets to high temperatures) because the reason they have darker skin is because they are from warmer places. There wouldn't naturally be anyone dark there, just like there isn't naturally anyone white in India or Africa.

    Reply
  4. IZikkid*2x

    November 29, 2019 5:58 am

    Oh so that explains the line in show yourself that goes like"you are the one you've been waiting for", i was confused at first.

    Reply
  5. Corey Dellosa

    November 29, 2019 6:20 am

    This movie was honestly kinda bad. It was super dull, boring, and useless overall. Sure a great cash grab for Disney. But Frozen IMO did not deserve a sequel. I really did enjoy Olaf's character development and the recap was honestly the funniest parts of the film. Overall, its not for me. Just a boring sequel that didnt deserve screen time

    Reply
  6. Satanic Stan

    November 29, 2019 7:40 am

    frozen 2 is way a lot more complicated than frozen 1…
    so i guess many kids cannot understand the story completely

    Reply
  7. pxnkstxr

    November 29, 2019 8:34 am

    Not something from the movie, but when Olaf disappeared this little girl went “Wheres Olaf ?” And the mom goes “he dead” ima stern tone

    Reply
  8. nick carlton

    November 29, 2019 9:47 am

    Hey dumb ass is this a frozen 2 vodeo or a frozen video Bc all I am watching is u talking about the first frozen

    Reply
  9. Faisal

    November 29, 2019 1:08 pm

    whats wrong with adhering to the environment of a specific setting? the setting is clearly meant to be European inspired where almost all people were white. Imagine having a movie about japanese ninjas where half of the people are white and black aswell like wtf? diversity should not come at the cost of the accuracy of the story.

    Reply
  10. KeirIsSoCrazyLike

    November 29, 2019 3:46 pm

    I love the four elements Air, Wind, Earth and Fire 😂😂😂 I had to replay it a few times cause it made me giggle

    Reply
  11. Aki Kaen

    November 29, 2019 6:30 pm

    Did no one else pick up on the sexual induendo when at the end Anna tells Kristof that she "prefers him in leather" I diedddddd 🤣
    ….

    That just me?

    Oh well 😂 😂 😂

    Reply
  12. papa bless

    November 29, 2019 6:34 pm

    there was also a very lowkey sex joke between anna and kristoff he was complaining about having to dress up and she kissed him and said "i prefer you in leather anyway" lol maybe im just dirty minded idk

    Reply
  13. John Adams

    November 29, 2019 7:22 pm

    missing from this th atonly adults would notice. Elsa is Leelu Mulstipass, the girl with the orange hair in Bruce willi's fifth element

    Reply
  14. Per Larse

    November 29, 2019 8:39 pm

    okay. honestly, i believe that disney is a satanic pedophilic cooperation, so im not supporting them at all. that said, called out frozen for not having any black charecters, when the original story takes place in scandinavia, is completely ridiculous. it's like, in 2019, being culturally correct means racist. wtf.

    Reply
  15. Chelsella Snipez

    November 29, 2019 9:04 pm

    Y’all are just gonna leave out “ I like you better in leather” when Christoph doesn’t wear leather

    Reply
  16. Isabella Peppersack

    November 29, 2019 9:32 pm

    You said that the 4 elementals where “air, wind, fire, and earth”……. what about WATER!!!!!!!! WIND AND AIR ARE THE SAME THINGS!!!!!!

    Reply
  17. jmochijams

    November 29, 2019 9:41 pm

    elsa: calling out the song
    olaf: screeching
    anna: olaf i think only one person should do it
    olaf: me too, she’s too pitchy

    Reply
  18. Parkour Hub

    November 29, 2019 9:56 pm

    The second one was nice but the first one was iconic. Also the second one got way too dark for a children’s movie. Like dc universe dark. But I did enjoy it

    Reply
  19. Breckyn Wahlmeier

    November 29, 2019 11:08 pm

    Anna: I like you better in leather
    Kristoff: has literally never worn leather
    Me: realizes what she means

    Reply
  20. Daney S

    November 30, 2019 3:50 am

    Frozen 2 was NOT aimed towards children. Of course children watched it and the first one was aimed towards children but this one was aimed towards young adults. Do your research.

    Reply
  21. TheDragiix3

    November 30, 2019 5:23 am

    Lack of diversity? What the fuck. This is a northern setting, there are no black fucking people up here. Stop with this shit.

    Reply
  22. Blame

    November 30, 2019 6:03 am

    Olaf is “that friend” who always flirts with girls and have the most corny jokes. I love Olaf, but not my friend.

    Reply
  23. syeda hafsa

    November 30, 2019 6:24 am

    The main concept of the story explained at the end of video was similar to the concept "LOVE YOURSELF"….. BTS ARMIES know that very well

    Reply
  24. lindsey s

    November 30, 2019 6:43 am

    An entire video about "things only adults noticed in Frozen 2" and no one's going to talk about the heavy implications between Elsa and Honeymaren??? After ALL the speculation about Elsa's sexuality from movie 1??? Or Kristoff and Ryder??? No?? just me??? cool

    Reply
  25. Paul George

    November 30, 2019 7:07 am

    At one point Olaf was looking at the camera talking about how we’ve all gotten a bit older and I felt that

    Reply
  26. kayen Hoogland

    November 30, 2019 8:31 am

    5:10
    The 4 spirits of the forest air, wind, fire and earth?? Pretty sure when you said wind you meant water…

    Reply
  27. Diana Gothong

    November 30, 2019 10:09 am

    Another thing is that we need to credit Frozen 2 for having a “main song” that has vocals reaching the roof. People will not be singing that anytime soon 😂😂😂

    Reply
  28. Freed

    November 30, 2019 12:31 pm

    So. Apparently my cinema mates didn't understand lot of this movie jokes. Sure they laughed at Olaf's, but I don't think they get the real meanings behind em. Like kristoff, or Elsa cringing at herself, that black box joke, or Olaf trying to normalized shit that don't make sense at all because it matures him (it?). Lol

    Reply
  29. Khei Cee

    November 30, 2019 3:00 pm

    The only reason why I watched Frozen was because of Olaf. Second time I cried because of him hahaha.

    OLAF is the new ❤️

    Reply

Leave a Reply